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Eating Disorders Like Bulimia Nervosa and Anorexia Nervosa

Avşar, Orçun. “Orthorexia Nervosa- As an Eating Disorder.” Edelweiss Psychiatry Open Access, vol. 1, no. 1, 2017, pp. 11-13.

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Eating disorders that include bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa are regularly diagnosed and addressed by health professionals. Orthorexia nervosa ought to be categorized either as a novel neuropsychiatric or an eating disorder. Additional studies concerning cognitive, nutritional, and eating patterns of orthorexia nervosa should be carried out to establish the hypercorrect situation entailed. Assessment of this article shows that it has consulted a wide pool of recent studies, which makes it rigorous. Nevertheless, the article fails to establish a clear elucidation of orthorexia nervosa, which leaves the reader confused as to whether it is an eating disorder or not, and how the problem should be effectively addressed. Orthorexia nervosa may be detected the moment a person commits most of the time for healthy foods and lifestyle while ignoring work and social activities. A careful evaluation of affected individuals establishes that restrictive diets generate nutritional deficiencies and social difficulties.

Dunn, Thomas, and Nicole Hawkins. “Orthorexia Nervosa.” Psychiatric Times, 2020, Web. 

Though the loss of weight might be a positive aspect of healthy diets, people with orthorexia nervosa do not have a disordered body image nor a determination for thinness. In its place, food consumption is limited anchored in the conviction that by eating just a specific type of diet, they will remain healthy. With respect to the treatment of patients who have orthorexia nervosa, interventions ought to be personalized. The assessment of this article shows that it is extensively researched and presented in a way that is easy even for the layman to understand. However, the article is short, and this means that it did not exhaustively address the disorder but shallowly presented critical points. Health professionals continue to encounter patients whose problems are like the ones of the youthful woman in the second case who had severe malnutrition, in addition to a body mass index of approximately 10.7. The continued increase in people’s interests in pathologically beneficial eating necessitates further research and psychiatrists who can diagnose and offer treatment for orthorexia nervosa.

Jay, Polish. “How Is Orthorexia Treated? Experts Explain.” Bustle, 2020, Web.

Orthorexia nervosa advances the moment that healthy eating turns into an obsession that leads to nervousness and distress regarding contravening the self-enacted nutritional regulations. Such a rigid devotion to a given diet or limitation of some foods may result in nutritional disparities, in addition to other negative medical concerns. Therapeutic connection with food necessitates mending affiliation with oneself, which necessitates knowledge, strength, and support. A thorough assessment of the article shows that it comprehensively tackles issues entailed since it presents a detailed description of the problem and recommended treatment. Nevertheless, its failure to apply knowledge from previous studies in the field could result in questioning its credibility. Most orthorexia nervosa patients begin with an interest in proper nutrition or medical concerns before this developing into excessive fear of foods that do not satisfy their healthful or other set standards. Regardless of the lack of treatment for orthorexia nervosa, patients should be advised to seek the assistance of a multidisciplinary team of professionals.

Łucka, Izabela, et al. “The Prevalence and Risk Factors of Orthorexia Nervosa among School-Age Youth of Pomeranian and Warmian-Masurian Voivodeships.” Psychiatria Polska, vol. 53, no. 2, 2019, pp. 383-398.

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Orthorexia nervosa entails the urge to pile up and even weigh some foods, in addition to planning meals beforehand, and compulsive notions regarding food when undertaking different tasks. The group of people with the highest risk of this problem are secondary school learners possibly attributable to their interest in physical attractiveness. There is a need for a successful diagnosis to provide effective treatment of orthorexia nervosa. Assessment of this article shows that the researchers employed an adequate sample size of 864 participants which improves the generalizability of the findings. Nonetheless, the article did not sufficiently describe recommendations that may assist future researchers to replicate the study in other samples. The study shows that some of the risk factors for orthorexia nervosa are age and BMI. A high BMI may play a key role in increasing the risk of orthorexia nervosa.

Oberle, Crystal, Dalton Klare, and Kevin Patyk. “Health Beliefs, Behaviors, and Symptoms Associated with Orthorexia Nervosa.” Eating and Weight Disorders-Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity, vol. 24, no. 3, 2019, pp. 495-506.

Orthorexia nervosa denotes an imagined condition that is typified by obsessive ideations and compulsive conduct regarding healthy eating habits. For people with orthorexia nervosa, healthy consumption patterns are associated with other medical conducts that encompass the application of supplements and complementary and alternative medicine. Nevertheless, regardless of the objective of realizing perfect health, affected individuals experience reduced physical health with symptoms associated with excessive nutritional restrictions. Assessment of the article establishes that the authors’ use of an adequate size of the sample that upholds diversity among subjects enhances the generalizability of the results. However, the application of participants from only one institution, a large university in the United States, affects the reliability of the findings negatively. This study enhances knowledge of orthorexia nervosa by making the reader understand the different aspects associated with it. There is a need to consult health professionals if an individual identifies excessive restriction of food consumption attributable to deluded views of their body image.

Plichta, Marta, and Marzena Jezewska-Zychowicz. “Orthorexic Tendency and Eating Disorders Symptoms in Polish Students: Examining Differences in Eating Behaviors.” Nutrients, vol. 12, no. 1, 2020, pp. 1-17.

People with orthorexia nervosa center more on a perfect diet that might have both preventive and remedial effects on some illnesses. Nonetheless, the behavior is obsessive and results in negative effects akin to the ones of eating disorders. There is a need for future studies regarding the application of sensitive tools that can assist in effective diagnosis of orthorexia nervosa, eating disorders, and other dietary patterns. The article failed to provide major details concerning orientation programs employed in the study. Without such information as the need to employ research in different institutions and regions, it is difficult to further expand the study. Learning about orthorexia nervosa shows that it does not only affect patients but also their friends and family members. There is a need for people to realize the extensiveness of the impact of the negative atmosphere generated by this psychological condition to improve care for the affected individuals.

Works Cited

Avşar, Orçun. “Orthorexia Nervosa- As an Eating Disorder.” Edelweiss Psychiatry Open Access, vol. 1, no. 1, 2017, pp. 11-13.

Dunn, Thomas, and Nicole Hawkins. “Orthorexia Nervosa.” Psychiatric Times, 2020, Web.

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Jay, Polish. “How Is Orthorexia Treated? Experts Explain.” Bustle, 2020, Web.

Łucka, Izabela, et al. “The Prevalence and Risk Factors of Orthorexia Nervosa among School-Age Youth of Pomeranian and Warmian-Masurian Voivodeships.” Psychiatria Polska, vol. 53, no. 2, 2019, pp. 383-398.

Oberle, Crystal, Dalton Klare, and Kevin Patyk. “Health Beliefs, Behaviors, and Symptoms Associated with Orthorexia Nervosa.” Eating and Weight Disorders-Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity, vol. 24, no. 3, 2019, pp. 495-506.

Plichta, Marta, and Marzena Jezewska-Zychowicz. “Orthorexic Tendency and Eating Disorders Symptoms in Polish Students: Examining Differences in Eating Behaviors.” Nutrients, vol. 12, no. 1, 2020, pp. 1-17.

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