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An Increase in SRT

The Goal of the Research

The objective of the study was to find out whether an increase in SRT in complex responses was as a result of an increase in premotor time constituent, motor aspect or both (Christina & Rose, 1985).

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How the Goal Relates to My Research

Any physical response comprises various movement parts, which are regarded as programs. The execution of any program requires prior preparation time, which plays a crucial role in SRT. Previous studies conducted by Henry and Rogers in 1960 regarding the memory drum theory reported that complex effects are elicited by complex instructions, which require a longer time to decode than simple instructions (Christina & Rose, 1985). However, it was necessary to determine the impact of premotor time component on SRT, hence the experiment.

Summary

Ten right-handed individuals without prior knowledge of all experimental aspects were recruited in the first section of the study. The subjects were required to execute three responses (C1, C2, and C) by pressing a regular telegraph key with the right index finger and micro switch reaction key with the right elbow when a tone was sounded (Christina & Rose, 1985). A forward change in the direction of motion did not alter the premotor component of SRT. However, doubling the number of movements led to a corresponding increase in SRT, which was thought to be due to the rising demand for accurate movements. Therefore, the number of movements and demand for accuracy were classified as facets of response intricacy, thereby supporting the theory that complex programming processes require longer times to trigger a response.

References

Anson, J. G. (1982). Memory drum theory: Alternative tests and explanations for the complexity effects on simple reaction time. Journal of Motor Behavior, 14(3), 228-246.

Anson, J. G. (1989). Effects of moment of inertia on simple reaction time. Journal of Motor Behavior, 21(1), 60-71.

Christina, R. W., & Rose, D. J. (1985). Premotor and motor reaction time as a function of response complexity. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 56(4), 306-315.

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StudyCorgi. (2022, January 23). An Increase in SRT. Retrieved from https://studycorgi.com/an-increase-in-srt/

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StudyCorgi. (2022, January 23). An Increase in SRT. https://studycorgi.com/an-increase-in-srt/

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"An Increase in SRT." StudyCorgi, 23 Jan. 2022, studycorgi.com/an-increase-in-srt/.

1. StudyCorgi. "An Increase in SRT." January 23, 2022. https://studycorgi.com/an-increase-in-srt/.


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StudyCorgi. "An Increase in SRT." January 23, 2022. https://studycorgi.com/an-increase-in-srt/.

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StudyCorgi. 2022. "An Increase in SRT." January 23, 2022. https://studycorgi.com/an-increase-in-srt/.

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StudyCorgi. (2022) 'An Increase in SRT'. 23 January.

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