Biological Theory of Aging | Free Essay Example

Biological Theory of Aging

Words: 263
Topic: Health & Medicine
Updated:

Response to the Statement of the Patient

As a matter of fact, not all the diseases are genetic. The mother and the father of the patient could have had the tendency to diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoporosis; however, due to a number of factors, namely healthy lifestyle or environment could live without experiencing these problems. Moreover, the aspect of stress is essential to be taken into consideration as well. The differences in lifestyles, meals, places of residence, interaction with other people, and habits could influence the health status of the patient in a significant way, and thus, she is experiencing problems that her family did not face.

Understanding the Biologic Aging Theory

In order for the patient to understand all the aspects of the biological aging theory and get better involved into the reasons, she has such health-related issues that neither her father nor her mother had, I can implement informative conversations into the care plan. The modern researchers state that nowadays, there are two fundamental perspectives that are related to the biological aging theory, namely genetically programmed and the error theory (Aldwin & Gilmer, 2013).

The programmed theory is centered on the idea that every organism develops until the reproduction period is over. During this time the human being has a programmed strategy of development, however, after the ability for the reproduction is lost, the organism can face the diseases that were not programmed genetically. The error theory is focused on the idea that some external factors may lead to changes in the DNA and affect genetic information.

References

Aldwin, C., & Gilmer, D. (2013). Health, illness, and optimal aging: Biological and psychosocial perspectives (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Hooyman, N., Kiyak, H., & Kawamoto, K. (2015). Aging matters: An introduction to social gerontology. Boston, MA: Pearson.