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“Hills like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway: Problem of Choice

Introduction

People usually appear before the choice: whether to do this or not, whether to go there or not, whether to stay with the person or to leave him/her. Analyzing the story “Hills like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway and imagining the conclusion of the story, three main developments may have been, which are supported by the communication of the characters and the plot development. The three main choices of the situation development: Jig may make the abortion, and remain with the American, she may have the abortion and leave the man, and the third way of their relationships is that she will not make the abortion, having won the man over, according to her opinion.

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Three main developments

The supportive elements of the first variant, Jig will make the abortion, but will not be satisfied with this her decision and her life will be connected with the American, may be found in the conversations and behavior of the story characters (Hashmi, 2003, p. 72). The American tries to assure Jig that “It’s really an awfully simple operation… it is not really an operation at all” (Hemingway, par. 40). These words just contribute that Jig is not willing to make an abortion but she will follow the man’s recommendations. Even choosing the drinks Jig is supported by the man’s opinion, he chooses that they are going to drink beer, he chooses that they will drink a new drink with water and some other sings. The impression is that Jig is directed by the man and has not had her own opinion. Moreover, Jig seems to be not only unwilling but also without any desires and aims in her life. Being pregnant, she does not think about her own future and her child, she just listens to the American and his desire to get rid of a child.

The situation may turn that Jig will have the abortion and leave the man (Hashmi, 2003, p. 72). The pointer of this way of relations development is that they are different. Jig is a romantic person, she manages to see the elephants in the hills, while the man sees nothing and even does not try to support his couple, does not try to make her pleased and satisfied in such a difficult period for her as abortion. She listens to him, but she may also show her character. An example is their quarrel, “You started it… I was being amused. I was having a fine time… I said the mountains looked like white elephants… I wanted to try this new drink” (Hemingway, par. 31). Jig is dependent on the man’s opinion, but their life together seems quite unreal. The everyday quarrels seem to be the common affair, as Jig is rather quickly shifted from the quarrel to the dwelling upon hills. Such life is not for Jig, as being a romantic and imaginative person, she needs the same man near her, she needs the person, who will also admire the hills, and see something unreal there just for fan, as she does. The American is absolutely different, he is rude and does not want to support Jig in such a complicated time for her.

The third way of the relationship is that Jig will not make the abortion, having won the man over (Hashmi, 2003, p. 72). This is the best variant, to my opinion, and the most appropriately fits the story development. Jig does not really love the man and his attitude to her is the same, but she smiles at him. Why? If it is not love, so what is it? The man said he would bring the bags over the other side of the station, and she smiled at him. When he returned she also smiled at him. What was this? This was the inner consideration that she is able to win him over, as he will always return to her. She knew it, so it may be firmly concluded that there is a hidden superiority of Jig over the man and there is the possibility for her to avoid the abortion and to make him stay with her, loving and subdued. The smile is one of the main reasons, why it may be concluded that inside her, Jig is able to be dominant, that she is able to conduct as she wants, the abortion is meant, and to make the man stays with her. This is not noticed at first sight, but the facts are seen. The man goes to the “other” (Hemingway, par. 103) side of the platform, but then still returns, without any calling of Jig.

Conclusion

In conclusion, three possible variants of the development of the relationships were offered: Jig will make the abortion and remain with the man, she will make the abortion and leave the man, and, the most realistic in my opinion, she will keep the child and the man, being won over, he will stay with her. Hemingway offered the story to the reader without the conclusion in order to give the reader the opportunity to think over the possible development of the situation and imagine the end of the story.

Works Cited

Hashmi, Nilofer. ’Hills like white elephants’: the jilting of Jig.” The Hemingway Review 23.1 (2003): 72-83. Georgia: Georgia Southern University. Print.

Hemingway, Ernest. Hills Like White Elephants. Web. 2009.

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StudyCorgi. (2021, November 17). “Hills like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway: Problem of Choice. https://studycorgi.com/hills-like-white-elephants-by-ernest-hemingway-problem-of-choice/

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"“Hills like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway: Problem of Choice." StudyCorgi, 17 Nov. 2021, studycorgi.com/hills-like-white-elephants-by-ernest-hemingway-problem-of-choice/.

1. StudyCorgi. "“Hills like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway: Problem of Choice." November 17, 2021. https://studycorgi.com/hills-like-white-elephants-by-ernest-hemingway-problem-of-choice/.


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StudyCorgi. "“Hills like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway: Problem of Choice." November 17, 2021. https://studycorgi.com/hills-like-white-elephants-by-ernest-hemingway-problem-of-choice/.

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StudyCorgi. 2021. "“Hills like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway: Problem of Choice." November 17, 2021. https://studycorgi.com/hills-like-white-elephants-by-ernest-hemingway-problem-of-choice/.

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StudyCorgi. (2021) '“Hills like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway: Problem of Choice'. 17 November.

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