Police Brutality

Words: 584
Topic: Law
Updated:

Our group comprised three females and one male. We learnt a lot regarding police brutality. Each one of us had strong opinions and reflections on the information that we gathered. It was a great experience to work in a group as we learned from each other and everyone made a contribution to the overall work of the group.

Police brutality is a rampant in many communities. Consequently, there is a lot of animosity between the police and the public. Many people fear the police because of the excessive force they have experienced or seen being meted on someone else.

Therefore, people are afraid to approach the police as they see them as an enemy. On the other hand, the police force defends itself and says that the nature of their work is dangerous hence the use of force in some cases. Thus, the police and the public point an accusing finger at each other.

The pattern in police brutality is among teenagers. Many teenagers have suffered police brutality as reported by family members and some teenagers. For example, Officer Adam Chapell was caught on camera brutally assaulting Brian Jeter a handcuffed teenager on the face using his foot (Dewberry, 2010). Another teenager Brandon Johnson was battered on the face by a police officer (“Feds Review”, 2010).

In other cases some teenagers were assaulted by the police yet they had not done any wrong and were walking home (Police brutality, 1999). Besides, the rate of crimes of brutal nature committed by teenagers is on the rise.

The societal implication of police brutality is community raising its voice against the brutality. Members of the society feel that police brutality is racially targeted, and they are speaking against it. Groups have been formed to champion the rights of the people against abuse from the police for instance, the group Citizens Against Brutality (CAB) in Indianapolis (Dewberry, 2010).

The support groups help victims in case they file a complaint against police brutality. There is a feeling that there needs to be a change within the police in regard to brutality although the police feel cases of police brutality are isolated and not the norm.

Experts say there is a need for change in the police department. Police brutality is unacceptable and investigations ought to be done to purge the police. There is a consensus that police brutality is a reality that the police cannot ignore, but face head on to look for a solution because the police should not hurt the very people they swore to protect.

The information on police brutality might be helpful in bringing about changes to the stakeholders to stem the issue. The police should look at the number of cases of police brutality reported, and proper investigations done, and those found guilty punished accordingly like it has happened to some officers (Police brutality in Indianapolis, n.d.).

On the other hand, it can provide information about teenagers’ crime statistics, and how they out to be guided to avoid crimes and early measures taken to avoid future brutal crimes.

We have learned that police brutality is rampant among teenagers. The police watch teenagers closely because of the high rates of crimes in this group.

Teenagers ought to keep off crimes, and concentrate in useful activities. Conversely, the police should stop brutality against teenagers, and other people to reduce the animosity that exists between them. Use of excessive force in arrests or checkups is unwarranted, and only creates bad blood between the public and the police.

Reference List

Dewberry, D. (2010). Police brutality cases spark non-profit. Retrieved March 26, 2013, from http://www.wishtv.com/dpp/news/local/marion_county/police-brutality-cases- spark-non-profit

Feds review Indianapolis police brutality claim. (2010). Retrieved March 26, 2013, from http://www.theindychannel.com/news/feds-review-indianapolis-police-brutality-  claim

Police brutality (1999). Retrieved March 26, 2013, from http://www.enotes.com/police- brutality-article

Police brutality in Indianapolis. (n.d.). Retrieved March 26, 2013, from http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~pshell/gammage/testimonies/indianapolis.html