Child Marriage Issue in Afghanistan | Free Essay Example

Child Marriage Issue in Afghanistan

Words: 610
Topic: Sociology
Updated:

Introduction

Child abuse has become a serious problem in Afghanistan due to the conditions children are facing as a result of perennial conflicts in this region. Child marriage has become a dominant crime in this nation and this has forced many organisations to step in and help to alleviate this condition (Fonts 2011). This essay is a summary of the connection between a child rights group and its link with child marriage, and an analysis of other forms of child abuse.

Connection between the ‘Human Fighters’ Group and Child Marriage

The ‘Human Fighters’ is a non government organisation that spearheads the realisation of constitutional provisions to ensure human rights are respected. It advocates for respect for human rights through various public activities including campaigns, sensitisation, education and legal processes. It has served various roles in ensuring children, women, youths and everybody in the society gets what they deserve.

Child marriage has become a common problem in Afghanistan due to the conflicts taking place in this country. This has forced children to abandon their families and seek to establish their homes through marriage (Wolfe 2010). This organisation ensures children access their right to education, health, association and movement. Women are not allowed to make individual decisions once they are married and this leads to human rights abuse. This organisation ensures that all children get access to education by educating them and their families on the need to go to schools until they are grown up for marriage.

Child Marriage

A Research conducted by a human rights watch group in 2009 revealed that almost 60 % of all marriages in Pakistan and Afghanistan involved children under the age of 16 years (Fonts 2011). Even though the UN classifies all people under the age of 18 years as children, these countries have set higher standards due to the evils that expose children to abuses.

Early marriage is caused by many reasons depending on social, cultural, economic and political factors. Social factors include the desire to follow peer pressure and modern trends. Most youths like doing what their peers do in order to identify with their groups. In addition, peer pressure compels most children to drop out of schools and seek employment (Gready 2004). However, this does not turn out as expected and leads to early marriages. The desire to reflect modern trends and fashions also motivate children to long to show off that they are able to rule the world.

Cultural factors include early marriages that are considered a tradition by most communities in Pakistan and Afghanistan. This forces girls to get married to old men without considering their level of education or age (Wolfe 2010). In addition, the desire to get dowry forces parents to force their children to marry rich men irrespective of their age. Most cultures in these countries have no respect for the laws that protect children against early marriages.

Lastly, poverty is responsible for many early child marriages in these countries. More than 60 % of the population lives below poverty line, therefore, they are in need of food, shelter and clothes that are difficult to afford. There are few employment and investment opportunities meaning that most people are unemployed.

Conclusion

This group is focused on ensuring that parents give their children opportunities to get quality education and enjoy their freedom to associate with others and express their views. Despite the existence of the belief that children should be allowed to complete their studies before being allowed to marry, this is not observed. There is the need to respect civil codes and natural provisions that human beings must not be forced to do anything that affects their lives.

References

Fonts, L, 2011, Child Abuse and Culture: Working with Diverse Families. The Guilford Press, New York.

Gready, P, 2004, Fighting for Human Rights. Routledge, London.

Wolfe, D., 2010, Child Abuse: Implications for Child Development: Developmental Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry. Sage Publication, New York.