Hypersomnia Subtypes, Sleep and Relapse in Bipolar Disorder

The article by Kaplan et al. (2015) focuses on one of the most common sleep disorders, hypersomnia. This condition is known to have serious side effects and to lead to numerous functioning problems, which necessitates its detailed analysis. Kaplan et al. (2015) pay particular attention to the possibilities of clarifying the disorder’s definition. The article is a valuable source on hypersomnia, and it offers insights into the disorder’s implications.

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The purpose of the study is to identify subtypes of the disease, which promotes the clarification of its definition. Scholars note that a detailed analysis of hypersomnia is crucial since this condition is frequently responsible for the recurrence of some psychiatric diseases. The intended audience is composed of healthcare specialists, patients suffering from hypersomnia, and their families or caregivers. The authors’ thesis is that hypersomnia comprises two separate subgroups – excessive sleepiness and long sleep – the analysis of which is likely to enhance finding solutions to patients’ health issues.

Methods employed by Kaplan et al. (2015) involved clinician-administered interviews and self-report inventories to determine hypersomnia features. The sample consisted of 159 participants aged 18-70 years who had been diagnosed with bipolar spectrum. Respondents were euthymic at the phase of the study entry. Each of the participants kept sleep diaries and used wrist actigraphs to collect prospective sleep data. In about seven months after the initiation of the study, the psychiatric status of individuals was reassessed. Kaplan et al. (2015) employed the latent profile and factor analyses to scrutinize empirical data. Scholars found two uncorrelated separate subtypes of hypersomnia: long sleep and excessive sleepiness. Excessive sleepiness at baseline was reported to predict the relapse of hypomania.

The authors of the article are specialists in psychology, psychiatry, and cognitive behavior therapy. Some of them are assistant professors, and some have Ph.D. degrees. The evidence found by the authors is convincing due to the selection of data collection and analysis methods and the duration of the study. Methods are appropriate since they allow singling out the necessary features for scrutinizing the study question. Kaplan et al. (2015) present an extensive review of literature in the introduction to their article that identifies what has been done on the problem and what aspects lack appropriate investigation. Also, scholars make a thorough analysis of the causes and consequences of hypersomnia. The article is the largest exploration of hypersomnia in a clinical sample with the use of self- and clinician-guided reports combined with objective and subjective measurements.

The organization of ideas is appropriate, and the authors’ language is objective and unbiased. Kaplan et al. (2015) use three tables to present some important characteristics and findings. These charts help to display a large amount of data in a concise and effective way. The authors had two aims at the beginning of the study: (1) to assess the independence of self-reported excessive sleepiness and long sleep and (2) to research the connection between hypersomnia subtypes, anticipated sleep duration, and episode relapse. Both of the goals were achieved in the course of research.

The article is a highly relevant source for healthcare specialists and patients who have hypersomnia and related disorders. Based on several types of analysis, Kaplan et al. (2015) succeeded in analyzing a complicated disorder, which is likely to promote treatment and prevention of side effects of hypersomnia. Differentiating between two subtypes of the disease allows healthcare specialists to come up with better treatment options for their patients.

A question for peers: Which of the two subtypes of hypersomnia do you consider to contribute to hypomania more? Why?

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Reference

Kaplan, K. A., McGlinchey, E. L., Soehner, A., Gershon, A., Talbot, L. S., Eidelman, P., … Harvey, A. G. (2015). Hypersomnia subtypes, sleep and relapse in bipolar disorder. Psychological Medicine, 45(8), 1751-1763.

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StudyCorgi. (2021, July 14). Hypersomnia Subtypes, Sleep and Relapse in Bipolar Disorder. Retrieved from https://studycorgi.com/hypersomnia-subtypes-sleep-and-relapse-in-bipolar-disorder/

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"Hypersomnia Subtypes, Sleep and Relapse in Bipolar Disorder." StudyCorgi, 14 July 2021, studycorgi.com/hypersomnia-subtypes-sleep-and-relapse-in-bipolar-disorder/.

1. StudyCorgi. "Hypersomnia Subtypes, Sleep and Relapse in Bipolar Disorder." July 14, 2021. https://studycorgi.com/hypersomnia-subtypes-sleep-and-relapse-in-bipolar-disorder/.


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StudyCorgi. "Hypersomnia Subtypes, Sleep and Relapse in Bipolar Disorder." July 14, 2021. https://studycorgi.com/hypersomnia-subtypes-sleep-and-relapse-in-bipolar-disorder/.

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StudyCorgi. 2021. "Hypersomnia Subtypes, Sleep and Relapse in Bipolar Disorder." July 14, 2021. https://studycorgi.com/hypersomnia-subtypes-sleep-and-relapse-in-bipolar-disorder/.

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StudyCorgi. (2021) 'Hypersomnia Subtypes, Sleep and Relapse in Bipolar Disorder'. 14 July.

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