"The Recess Queen" a Book by Alexis O'Neill | Free Essay Example

“The Recess Queen” a Book by Alexis O’Neill

Words: 3589
Topic: Literature
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Summary of the story

The recess queen story is about recess and playing with other children. The book is about schoolyard bully who is lightened through gentleness and friendship. The Mean Jean is regarded as the recess queen in the story as depicted in the words, “Mean Jean the Recess Queen” (O’Neill 10). Mean Jean would intimidate every other classmate through her actions. She would kick, swing, and blast before all other pupils as she bounces and swings around in their presence. O’Neill says, “She’d push ‘em and smoosh ‘em, lollapaloosh ‘em” (2). The story turns when the tiny Katie Sue eventually joins the school. Katie comes in without the knowledge and regard of the recess queen-Mean Jean. She could therefore kick, swing, and even bounce in complete disregard of Mean Jean.

Katie would do this before Jean had a chance. This was unordinary and unexpected in the school. When Katie Sue takes over the privileged role that Mean Jean had enjoyed for a long period, Jean sulks. She lets Katie to have her way in the recess. This goes on until later on when Katie Sue invites Mean Jean to play with her. Mean Jean finds it difficult to refuse the invitation from the new girl. The book is written in a fun evoking manner. The author adopts a rollicking rhythm that captures the attention of the reader. The book is also very humorous, for instance, when it narrates of steam coming from Mean Jean’s ears. It is also humorous when Mean Jean bounces a schoolmate as if he were a ball.

Personal Reaction to the Story

The story of the Recess queen is not only a good source of humor to the kids but also an appealing to the adult reader. The story also provides an example to the young kids to learn about recess and the likely occurrence. Most of the kids have an experience on matters of recess. They can therefore understand and relate to the feelings that other kids experience when Mean Jean bounces on them. Kids can also relate to the feelings that others have when one Mean Jean takes over all their happiness by barring others from kicking, swinging, and even bouncing. A sense of relief to the young readers comes in when Katie Sue comes into the picture. Kids can learn about the virtue of kindness that is extended to the rude Marie Jean by Katie. The Recess Queen is a good book for the kids owing to its rich content and humor.

Pre-reading Lesson Plan

  • July 8, 2019
  • From 2.00 P.M to 2.40 P.M
  • No. of students: 30. Age range: 5-7years. Grade level: Standard one
  • New York State Standards –‘SJ-S’

Pre-assessment

The teacher will ascertain that the pupils have the ability to read, write, speak, and listen. This will enable the teacher to prepare information in the forms that can be processed and understood at their level. Pre-assessment can be done by going through past examinations that the students have sat for, through oral interview where the teacher randomly picks on a student and asks him or her the meaning of related vocabulary such as kind, rude, kick, and swing. The teacher pre-assesses the ability of the students to gather data, ideas, and facts through listening and reading. With this information, the teacher will filter the level of language to use when delivering the lesson. The materials that the teacher adopts are tailored in a way that the learner can interpret relationships, general ideas, and concepts that are put in their level of understanding. The teacher also ascertains that the learners have the ability to use information delivered in written, oral, and in electronic form. This stage is followed by assessment of the context of this lesson on recess and/or whether learners have occasional experience on it. Learners are prepared for the activities of the main lesson.

Specific objectives

At the end of this lesson, the students should be able to predict and identify the content of the book the Recess Queen and some acts of thoughtfulness that they can expect from their friends during recess in playing fields.

Materials

The learning and resource materials for the lesson will include the book The Recess Queen and journals. Learners will be instructed to prepare vocabulary cards, balls, and swings as teaching aids and learning resources.

Procedures

To introduce the pre-reading lesson, the teacher will have a football, the book The Recess Queen, a sample vocabulary card, and a journal. The teacher will ask students to identify the items by name and draw them to raise their interest. The teacher will probe on the understanding of the students on vocabularies such as ’kick’, ‘kind’, and ‘rude’.

The teacher shall then shallowly probe learners on their knowledge about recess and what they enjoy doing in recess in relation to playing items that he or she has. The probing questions may include, what do you like doing during recess? How do you like swinging and playing the ball during recess? How often do you have your recess? Can you remember a friend that interrupted your games during recess? How did you react to the situation?

After the probing questions, the teacher will then illustrate the book –The Recess Queen. The illustration will be done through displaying the book by lifting it up. The third step will be involving the learners in making a wise guess about the expected content of the book. The fourth step will be provoking the students to go and read the book. The teacher will involve learners in an exposition of the front and the back cover of the book. The front cover will include an exploration of the illustration therein. The students will use their observation skills to analyze the drawing on the front part of the cover. The teacher will facilitate the discussion by asking questions about the drawings and the likely suggestions that the picture poses. For example, “What was the intention of the author when he decided to do this drawing on the cover of the book?”, or what does the front picture tell you about the content of the book?”, “From the illustrations on the front cover of the book, can you predict who is the Recess Queen and/or her behavior? The author of the book says, “Mean Jean the Recess Queen” (O’Neill 10). Explain what you understand by this statement. The teacher will also involve the learner in discussing the back cover of the book. Students will read what the author says about the book and about him as the teacher expounds on the reading. The next step will be an overview of the story by the teacher as he involves learners in reading specifically cited episodes of the book. Learners will listen to the teacher as he or she narrates a summary of the various sections of the book. The learners will be expected to make some rough notes as the teacher explains. The conclusion will involve asking oral questions to the students and issuing them with an assignment to read the book before the main lesson.

Limits

The expected limits to the pre-lesson may include an abrupt change of pre- lesson schedule by the administration, or power outranges and hence low or not enough lighting in the class during the lesson. The alternative for these eventualities would be to reschedule the pre- lesson for a day when all facilities will be available or to move students to another venue with enough lighting. It would be a big limitation if the school library does not provide enough copies of the book The Recess Queen since it shall be the main reading book. In case of such an occurrence, learners will be required to share their few personal copies during the lesson.

Evaluation

Summative evaluation will be done through asking oral questions throughout the pre-lesson. The teacher assesses learners by monitoring their response to various concepts and occurrences during the pre-reading lesson for example through their verbal and no-verbal cues. Summative evaluation will be done at the end of the pre-reading lesson. Pre-reading questions will include drawing and writing. The response on various questions will indicate whether the objectives of the pre-reading lessons were achieved or not.

Enrichment

The pre-reading lesson will be enriched by the use of examples of occurrences in real life. The teacher will also use questions to enrich the focus of the learner.

Remediation

The teacher will offer special attention to learners who need remediation. This will be done through explaining the concept at a personal level to bring them up to the understanding level of others. Students with reading problems will be assisted by the teacher and their neighbors during the lesson. The teacher will also correct their pronunciation of words whenever they have difficulties during reading.

Follow-up

In order to ensure follow-up of the pre-reading concept, the reading lesson shall involve a recap of the pre-reading lesson to remind students of the previous study. The teacher will randomly appoint learners to answer questions from the previous lesson. For example, “James, what did you learn from our pre-reading lesson about the book The Recess Queen? The teacher will also do a follow-up to cross check whether the pupils read the book as part of their assignment.

During-reading Lesson Plan

  • July 8, 2019
  • From 2.00 P.M to 2.40 P.M
  • No. of students: 30. Age range: 5-7years. Grade level: Standard one
  • New York State Standards –‘SJ-S’

Pre-assessment

The teacher will verify that the pupils have the ability to read, write, speak, and listen by probing them on these skills. Probing the students will enable the teacher to prepare the lesson in the forms that can be easily accessible and understandable by learners at their level. Pre-assessment will be done through oral interview where the teacher randomly picks on a student and asks him or her about recess and/or acts kindness. For example, the teacher will ask the learners, “What do you enjoy doing during recess?” or “How would you feel if one of your colleagues prevents you from playing your favorite game during recess? What would be your reaction?” The teacher will then assess the ability of students to gather information, ideas, and facts through listening, discussing, and reading. After laying the foundation, the teacher shall be able to identify the level of language for the lesson. The book The Recess Queen shall be tailored in a way that students can interpret relationships, general ideas, and concepts in the book. Finally, the teacher will verify that students have the ability to use information delivered in written, oral, and in electronic form by probing them on these areas. The students will also be probed on their experience on the context of recess and kindness. At this point, the teacher will be certain that students are prepared for the activities of the main lesson.

Specific objectives

At the end of this lesson, students should be able to identify the content of the book The Recess Queen and some acts of kindness found in it.

Materials

The lesson will use the book The Recess Queen together with journals. Learners will be instructed to prepare vocabulary cards, balls, and swings as teaching resources and learning resources.

Procedures

To introduce the during-reading lesson, the teacher will come into the class with a football, the book, a sample vocabulary card, and a journal. The teacher will ask students to identify the items by names and draw them to raise their interest. This will be followed by a review of the vocabularies. For example, a learner will be called to kick the ball, to help another one with writing problems, and to illustrate the swinging act. Learners will elicit vocabularies swing, kick, kind, and rude.

The teacher will shallowly probe learners on their knowledge about recess and what they enjoy doing in recess in relation to playing items. He or she will then illustrate the book The Recess Queen. The illustration will be done through displaying the book by lifting it up. The third step will be involving learners in making a wise guess about the expected content of the book. The fourth step will be engaging them in reading. For example, one student will be requested to read from page one to page two. When he or she reaches the phrase, “Nobody bounced until Mean Jean bounced” (O’Neill 2), the teacher will ask the students to deduce the active verb in the phrase. He or she will then explain the meaning of the word ‘bounced’ by having one student bounce in front of the class. The teacher will ask questions from the first portion, for example, the reasons for other students to fold their hands when Mean Jean begins bouncing. Students shall also be made to predict what would happen if Jean were their playmate and/or how they would feel. Another student will read up to page six and stop at the phrase, “Until one day…” (O’Neill 6). At this point, the teacher will engage every pupil to predict a power that could stop Jean from being rude. All students will read in unison from page six to seven and stop at the phrase, “…a new kid came to school” (O’Neill 7). The class will review their prediction to see who was right. Learners will be asked to cite the character of Katie Sue from page seven. For example, Jean is referred to as a queen. Students shall compare Jean and Katie Sue in the field and predict their feelings. For example, students will be referred to the statements, “set the record straight” (O’Neill 13) and “Jean had an ugly look on her face with steam coming out of her ears” (O’Neill 13). Students will continue reading up to the phrase, “…jump with me” (O’Neill 18) where they will be asked to write the character shown by Katie Sue by that invitation to Jean. They will also predict the likely reaction of Mean Jean. One student shall be appointed by the teacher to continue reading up to the phrase, “…as it too scared to move at all” (O’Neill 19). At this point, the teacher will ask the students to discuss the behavior and character of Jean in pairs. Finally, the reader will continue reading and stop at the statement, “Jean jumped in with Katie sue” (O’Neill 21). Students will mark their earlier prediction on the character of Jean and predict how the story is likely to end. The students will then read together up to the phrase, “with her friends” (O’Neill 25). At this point, learners will review the different illustrations in the book and the feelings they evoke. They will listen to the teacher as he or she thanks them for reading and predicting wisely, as he or she narrates a summary of the various sections of the book. They will then share their journal for discussion. The conclusion will involve asking oral questions to the students, for example, what would have happened if Katie Sue did not come to school? Why should students report a character like Mean Jean to the teacher?

Limits

The expected limits to the reading lesson may include abrupt change of pre- lesson schedule by the administration, delay of delivery of text books and journals, or electrical faults hence leading to dim lighting in the class during this time. The alternative for these eventualities would be to reschedule the lesson for a day when all facilities will be available, or to use an artificial source of light in case lights go off.

Evaluation

Summative evaluation will be done through asking oral questions throughout the reading lesson. The teacher will weigh the learners by closely monitoring their reaction to various statements from the book. For example, the statement, “Jean jumped in with Katie sue” (O’Neill 21) should make them change their verbal and no-verbal cues. Summative evaluation will be done at the end of the reading lesson. Reading questions will include drawing and writing. The response on various reading questions will indicate whether the goals of the lessons were met.

Enrichment

The reading lesson will be enriched through the use of examples of occurrences in the book and in the lives of students and their friends.

Remediation

During the reading lesson, the teacher will offer special attention to learners who need remediation by helping them pronounce words correctly. The teacher will also be explaining the concept at a personal level to bring them up to the understanding level of others. Learners will also be allowed to ask questions during the reading.

Follow-up

In order to ensure follow-up of the reading concept, the post-reading lesson shall involve a recap of it to remind the students of the previous study. The teacher will also constantly remind learners of the concept every time they go out to play. For example, “Remember to behave like Katie Sue and not like Mean Jean,” or if anyone of you is rude like the Mean Jean that we read about, kindly remember to report him or her to the teacher.” Such statements will make the lesson have more relevancies to real life circumstances that the learners face. Students will also be asked to narrate the story to their friends and parents at home and/or teach them the lessons that the story brings out.

After-reading Lesson Plan

  • July 8, 2013
  • From 2.00 P.M to 2.40 P.M
  • No. of students: 30. Age range: 5-7years. Grade level: Standard one
  • New York State Standards –‘SJ-S’

Pre-assessment

In the post-reading lesson, the teacher will ascertain that the pupils had the ability to read, write, speak, and listen. He or she will also use probing questions to ascertain that the students understood the lesson. Post-reading assessment can be done by going through the examinations that the students have sat for through oral interview where the teacher randomly picks a student to ask him or her questions. This information will enable the teacher to evaluate whether the level of language used when delivering the lesson was appropriate. The post-reading lesson will enable the teacher to evaluate whether the concepts and materials that he or she adopted were tailored in a way that learners could have been able to interpret relationships, general ideas, and the concepts taught in class. The teacher also ascertains that the learners had the ability to use information delivered in written, oral, and in electronic forms.

Specific Objectives

At the end of the post-reading lesson, students should be able to indicate the skills derived from the during-reading and pre-reading lesson. They should also identify the content of the book The Recess Queen and acts of sympathy depicted in the book. The skills of initiating tokens of compassion and sustaining them in the society are also reinforced at this stage by enumerating their benefits.

Materials

The lesson will use the book The Recess Queen along with journals. Learners are instructed to preserve words cards, balls, and swings.

Procedures

To introduce the post-reading lesson, the teacher will come into the class with the book, a sample vocabulary card, and a journal. He or she will then shallowly probe the learners on their understanding and knowledge about recess and what they enjoyed learning about in the book. The third step will be involving the students in summarizing what they learnt from the book on issues of humanity and/or acts of insolence to their peers. The fourth step will be prompting them to go and read the book again in an attempt to make the issues learnt more vivid and clear. The teacher will then give an overview of the story provided in the book. Learners will listen to the teacher as he or she narrates a summary of the various sections of the book and the work covered in the reading lesson. The conclusion will involve asking oral questions to students and issuing them with an assignment to re-read the book provided for reference during the various reading sessions.

Limits

The expected limits to the pre-lesson may include abrupt change of post-reading lesson, time, and delay by the administration or power blackouts in the projected time of the lesson. The alternative for these eventualities would be to reschedule the post reading- lesson for a day when time and lights will be available.

Evaluation

Post-reading summative evaluation will be done using oral questions that are asked throughout the post-reading lesson. For example, learners will be required to explain excerpts like, explain why “Jean jumped in with Katie Sue” (O’Neill 21). Students will be assessed by monitoring their response to various oral questions concerning the concepts and occurrences during the reading lesson. Moreover, the verbal and non-verbal cues that they depict will also be used for evaluation. Summative evaluation will be carried out at the end of the post-reading lesson. The post-reading questions will include oral and demonstration assignments. The response given for different oral questions will indicate whether the objectives of the whole work were achieved.

Enrichment

The post-reading lesson will be enriched using visual aids for example the reference book. The lesson will also be enriched through peer reviews and interactions.

Remediation

Since some of the learners have difficulties in understanding the concepts that are meant for their level, special attention will be accorded to those who need remediation. This shall be done through explaining the concept at a personal level to each student.

Follow-up

Follow-up will be done to ensure that the post-reading lesson is fruitful. This will be done through an oral recap of the main points, lessons, and events in the story.

Works Cited

O’Neill, Alexis. The Recess Queen. Canada: Scholastic Press, 2002. Print.