Youth Unemployment Rates in Canadian Society | Free Essay Example

Youth Unemployment Rates in Canadian Society

Words: 588
Topic: Sociology
Updated:

The problem under investigation is the fact that “the unemployment rate among people in the 18-25 age group is higher than any other age group in Canadian society.” This issue proves that there is a necessity to consider some ways to make the discussed population work and improve their socioeconomic status, which also affects the image of the whole country. However, it will be advantageous to redefine the problem beforehand, to enhance the understanding of its peculiarities and improve the quality of possible solutions (Jones).

In the framework of coaching, attention should be paid to the enhancement opportunities. Focusing on the ability problems, it is possible to state that “people from Canadian society who are in the 18-25 age group fail to get a job because they do not receive enough information about the available employment opportunities and lack understanding”. It is also possible to state that “people from Canadian society who are in the 18-25 age group fail to get a job because of the lack of vacancies that are caused by a rising number of working pensioners and expatriates”.

Considering counseling, it is possible to change the definition of the problem so that it focuses on the necessity to recognize the very existence of the issue. In other words, people’s attitudes should be considered. Thus, a redefined version of the problem may sound as “in comparison to other populations of Canadian society, individuals in the 18-25 age group are less likely to seek employment”. It is also possible to state that “Canadians who are 18-25 years old prefer having a lot of free time instead of working”.

The discussed problem can be redefined in the framework of supportive communication based on congruence. In this way, existing statistics allows claiming that “the representatives of Canadian society who in the 18-25 age group are unemployed, which has negative influences on the country’s economy and people’s well-being” (Galarneau, Morissette, and Usalcas 2). It is also possible to say that “the unemployment rate increases mostly within the 18-25 age group of Canadian society, which means that this population is the most vulnerable on the employment market”.

If communication was based on incongruence, the same problem could sound as “the unemployment rate among Canadians who are 18-25 years old increases, but it is not a critical problem for the country and its citizens because the elderly remain in the workflow”. It might also be possible to state that “the representatives of Canadian society who are 18-25 years old are often unemployed, but it is normal for this age group as they are supported by parents and need to continue education”.

Even it is not appropriate, communication may be evaluative. Then, the discussed problem can be defined as “it is wrong that the unemployment rate among people in the 18-25 age group is higher than any other age group in Canadian society, as they are young and able to work more”. It may also be said that “Canadian people in the 18-25 age group have the highest unemployment rate because they are incompetent”.

Describing the problem in the framework of supportive communication, it is important to ensure that it is also descriptive (Whetten and Cameron 199). In this way, the discussed problem may sound as “Canadians who are 18-25 years old face more difficulties with employment than other groups of the population”. It is also possible to redefine this issue as “Canadian employers are less interested in people who are 18-25 years old in comparison to any other age group in society”.

Works Cited

Galarneau, Diane, René Morissette, and Jeannine Usalcas. What Has Changed for Young People in Canada? 2013. Web.

Jones, Morgan. “11 Ways to Restate Problems to Get Better Solutions”. Idea Sandbox. Web.

Whetten, David, and Kim Cameron. Developing Management Skills. Prentice Hall, 2010.