Developing a Teaching Plan for Immunizations

Introduction

The question of getting children immunized has always produced a lot of concern among parents. Many of them consider vaccination a dangerous practice that may put their child’s life under threat. Therefore, it is a duty of a healthcare provider to supply parents with necessary information about immunization and suggest support and education throughout the process of a child’s development. Developing a teaching plan about immunizations involves understanding the parents’ biggest concerns and coming up with the most successful communication strategies that will promote parents’ agreement to immunization.

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Understanding Parents’ Concerns

One of the most common beliefs associated with vaccination is that it can cause autism. Other concerns include thinking that vaccines are more dangerous than the diseases that they are supposed to prevent, considering that the number of vaccines is too big for small children, and worrying about the side effects and adverse events (“Talking with parents about vaccines for infants,” 2012). All of these issues can be reassured by proper explanation and examples. A healthcare provider can give evidence of the number of non-immunization negative outcomes as opposed to immunization.

Also, he or she can tell parents about the threats of diseases against which their child can receive protection. Some parents merely do not have enough grounded knowledge and rely on the rumors they have heard. In such cases, appropriate evidence and explanation can serve as persuasive methods. What concerns the issue of having too many vaccines in a short time, it is necessary to explain to the parents that every time they postpone immunization, their child is exposed to an increased risk (“Talking with parents about vaccines for infants,” 2012).

Communication Strategies

Successful communication involves a two-way discussion when a healthcare provider gives information and answers the parents’ questions. It is a good idea to use the opportunity to talk about immunization as early as possible so that parents would have enough time to consider it and to come up with questions. Thus, a nurse may introduce this question even at a prenatal stage.

Advantageous strategies include patient listening, giving a chance to ask questions, admitting advantages and disadvantages of vaccination, and giving regard to parents’ authority (“Talking with parents about vaccines for infants,” 2012). In case if parents continue to opposing immunization, a healthcare practitioner should reiterate the possible threats and keep an eye on such children, as they might need special care because of their parents’ decision not to get them protected.

Immunization Schedules

The following schedules for vaccinations are recommended for children from infancy to young adult age:

  • birth: HepB against hepatitis B;
  • one-two months: HepB against hepatitis B;
  • two-four months: RV against rotavirus, DTaP against diphtheria, Hib against haemophilus influenzae type B, PCV against pneumococcus; IPV against polio;
  • six months: HepB against hepatitis B, RV against rotavirus, DTaP against diphtheria, Hib against haemophilus influenzae type B, PCV against pneumococcus, IPV against polio, flu vaccine against influenza;
  • twelve months: HepB against hepatitis B, Hib against haemophilus influenzae type B, PCV against pneumococcus, IPV against polio, flu vaccine against influenza, MMR against measles and mumps, varicella against chickenpox, HepA against hepatitis A;
  • fifteen months: HepB against hepatitis B, DTaP against diphtheria, Hib against haemophilus influenzae type B, PCV against pneumococcus, IPV against Polio, flu vaccine against influenza, MMR against measles and mumps, varicella against chickenpox, HepA against hepatitis A;
  • eighteen months: HepB against hepatitis B, DTaP against diphtheria, IPV against Polio, flu vaccine against influenza, HepA against hepatitis A;
  • nineteen-twenty-three months: flu vaccine against influenza, HepA against hepatitis A;
  • two-three years: flu vaccine against influenza;
  • four-six years: DTaP against diphtheria, IPV against polio, flu vaccine against influenza, MMR against measles and mumps, varicella against chickenpox (“2017 recommended immunizations for children from birth through six years old,” 2017);
  • seven-eight years: flu vaccine against influenza;
  • nine-ten years: flu vaccine against influenza;
  • eleven-twelve years: flu vaccine against influenza, Tdap against tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis, HPV against human papillomavirus (a two-shot series at least half a year apart), MenACWY against the meningococcal disease (a booster shot is recommended in four years);
  • thirteen-fifteen years: flu vaccine against influenza;
  • sixteen-eighteen years: flu vaccine against influenza, MenACWY against the meningococcal disease (“2017 recommended immunizations for children 7-18 years old,” 2017).

Children at the age of seven-eighteen may be given some other vaccines if there is an increased threat of certain diseases, if the child missed some vaccinations, or if parents decide to have their child immunized after talking to a healthcare provider (“2017 recommended immunizations for children 7-18 years old,” 2017).

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Conclusion

Immunization helps to protect infants and children from such serious diseases as hepatitis, diphtheria, measles, chickenpox, polio, influenza, meningitis, and others. Unfortunately, not all parents understand the significance of vaccination for the health of their children. In cases when parents are opposed to immunization, a healthcare provider needs to develop a teaching plan which would explain the benefits of having a child immunized. This can be done either by describing the benefits of various vaccines or by giving examples of adverse outcomes for the children whose parents insisted on not having them immunized. Whatever approach the healthcare worker chooses, he or she needs to provide the exhaustive information so that parents could realize the seriousness of their decision.

References

2017 recommended immunizations for children 7-18 years old. (2017)

2017 recommended immunizations for children from birth through six years old. (2017)

Talking with parents about vaccines for infants: Strategies for health care professionals. (2012)

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StudyCorgi. (2021, January 5). Developing a Teaching Plan for Immunizations. Retrieved from https://studycorgi.com/developing-a-teaching-plan-for-immunizations/

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"Developing a Teaching Plan for Immunizations." StudyCorgi, 5 Jan. 2021, studycorgi.com/developing-a-teaching-plan-for-immunizations/.

1. StudyCorgi. "Developing a Teaching Plan for Immunizations." January 5, 2021. https://studycorgi.com/developing-a-teaching-plan-for-immunizations/.


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StudyCorgi. "Developing a Teaching Plan for Immunizations." January 5, 2021. https://studycorgi.com/developing-a-teaching-plan-for-immunizations/.

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StudyCorgi. 2021. "Developing a Teaching Plan for Immunizations." January 5, 2021. https://studycorgi.com/developing-a-teaching-plan-for-immunizations/.

References

StudyCorgi. (2021) 'Developing a Teaching Plan for Immunizations'. 5 January.

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