Early Elective Delivery as American Nursing Issue

Introduction

Early elective delivery (EED) is a major nursing problem in the United States. The study shows that at least 160,000 of nativities covered by Medicaid are elective deliveries (Bodner, Wierrani, Grunberger, & Bodner-Adler, 2013). Such deliveries pose an immense danger to mothers and children. Besides, the government incurs a considerable cost in catering for complications attributed to early elective delivery. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists is against EED unless there are adequate medical grounds (Clark et al., 2013). Studies show that the mortality rate is high among children born through EED (Clark et al., 2013). Besides, the children develop numerous complications, which include developmental challenges and breathing and feeding problems. In spite of the dangers attributed to EED, some doctors and pregnant mothers continue to perform it without legitimate medical grounds. Ehrenthal, Hoffman, Jiang, and Ostrum (2015) argue, “Today, over 10-20 percent of all deliveries scheduled as C-section or induced before 39 weeks are not medically indicated” (p. 1051). This study will evaluate early elective delivery as a primary nursing problem in the United States.

We will write a
custom essay
specifically for you

for only $16.05 $11/page
308 certified writers online
Learn More

Problem Statement

The problem of early elective delivery is a major concern in the United States due to its risks. Ertugrul et al. (2013) maintain that EED has no benefits. Nevertheless, it poses a significant threat to both the mother and the infant. According to Ertugrul et al. (2013), “babies born before 39 weeks are at risk for many serious health complications because vital organs like the brain, lungs, and liver have not been fully developed” (p. 109). Children born through EED are at a danger of suffering from respiratory distress disorder and sepsis. On the other hand, mothers who undergo EED are at risk of developing maternal complications like postpartum hemorrhage. Hoffmire, Chess, Saad, and Glantz (2012) allege that EED uses insidious internal fetal examining gadgets that may affect the mother. The devices may lead to mothers suffering from infections. The cost of medical care for a child born through EED is higher than that of an infant born naturally. The Medicaid program pays at least $20,000 to cater to the medical bill of a preterm child (Hoffmire et al., 2012). On the other hand, the program pays $2,100 for kids born after 39 weeks (Hoffmire et al., 2012). Reddy, Ko, Raju, and Willinger (2014) maintain that a 10% reduction of EED cases would lower the Medicaid cost by $75 million. Thus, apart from posing a threat to mother and child, EED is an economic burden to the United States.

Objectives

The purpose of this project is to analyze early elective delivery as a significant nursing problem in the United States. The study will evaluate the factors that contribute to doctors and mothers opting to conduct EED. Additionally, it will scrutinize the dangers of the practice. The research will be of significant value to parents who opt for EED without knowing its impacts.

References

Bodner, K., Wierrani, F., Grunberger, W., & Bodner-Adler, B. (2013). Influence of the mode of delivery on maternal and neonatal outcomes: A comparison between elective cesarean section and planned vaginal delivery in a low-risk obstetric population. Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 283(6), 1193-1198.

Clark, S., Miller, D., Belfort, M., Dildy, G., Frye, D., & Meyers, J. (2013). Neonatal and maternal outcomes associated with elective term delivery. American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, 200(2), 156-175.

Ehrenthal, D., Hoffman, M., Jiang, X., & Ostrum, G. (2015). Neonatal outcomes after implementation of guidelines limiting elective delivery before 39 weeks of gestation. Obstetrics & Gynecology, 118(5), 1047-1055.

Ertugrul, S., Gun, I., Mungen, E., Muhcu, M., Kilic, S., & Atay, V. (2013). Evaluation of neonatal outcomes in elective repeat cesarean delivery at term according to weeks of gestation. The Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Research, 39(1), 105-112.

Get your
100% original paper
on any topic

done in as little as
3 hours
Learn More

Hoffmire, C., Chess, P., Saad, T., & Glantz, C. (2012). Elective delivery before 39 weeks: The risk of infant admission to the neonatal intensive care unit. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 16(5), 1053-1062.

Reddy, U., Ko, C., Raju, T., & Willinger, M. (2014). Delivery indications at late‐preterm gestations and infant mortality rates in the United States. Pediatrics, 124(1), 234‐40.

Print Сite this

Cite this paper

Select style

Reference

StudyCorgi. (2020, December 27). Early Elective Delivery as American Nursing Issue. Retrieved from https://studycorgi.com/early-elective-delivery-as-american-nursing-issue/

Work Cited

"Early Elective Delivery as American Nursing Issue." StudyCorgi, 27 Dec. 2020, studycorgi.com/early-elective-delivery-as-american-nursing-issue/.

1. StudyCorgi. "Early Elective Delivery as American Nursing Issue." December 27, 2020. https://studycorgi.com/early-elective-delivery-as-american-nursing-issue/.


Bibliography


StudyCorgi. "Early Elective Delivery as American Nursing Issue." December 27, 2020. https://studycorgi.com/early-elective-delivery-as-american-nursing-issue/.

References

StudyCorgi. 2020. "Early Elective Delivery as American Nursing Issue." December 27, 2020. https://studycorgi.com/early-elective-delivery-as-american-nursing-issue/.

References

StudyCorgi. (2020) 'Early Elective Delivery as American Nursing Issue'. 27 December.

This paper was written and submitted to our database by a student to assist your with your own studies. You are free to use it to write your own assignment, however you must reference it properly.

If you are the original creator of this paper and no longer wish to have it published on StudyCorgi, request the removal.