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Industrialization and Its Consequences: Lesson Plan

Purpose

This is a lesson plan for the topic “Big Seven Era: Industrialization and its Consequences, 1750-1914 CE”. It is important that every student understands the contemporary technological developments whilst linking them up with classical developments. For every aspect of modern technology, there is a classical or traditional foundation. “The Industrial Revolution as a World Event: Big Era Seven” will therefore create a foundational understanding to students on the modern developments.

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Assumptions

  • In order to develop this lesson plan, there are some specific assumptions made. Firstly, it is assumed that the teacher and the students will have access to the following materials:
  1. Grade Book
  2. Seminar
  3. Discussion Board
  4. Synchronous Seminar
  5. Blogs
  6. Wikis
  7. Collaborative Media
  8. Presentational Media
  • Another assumption is that the lesson plan is developed within the context of an LMS.
  • It is important to assume also that the environment under which this learning will take place allows the teacher to embed and use low-threshold technologies for the purposes of making students grasp the concepts
  • Since this will be a one week-long unit of instruction, it is assumed that students are capable of devoting 10 hours during the week for study and activities related to the subject

Topic

Course

The area of study is world history. There are different units and courses within the world history. From the many units and courses within the world history area of study, this lesson will aim at providing students with the general, specific, and detailed understanding of “Big Seven Era: Industrialization and its Consequences, 1750-1914 CE”. Many students are of the opinion that industrial revolution should be associated with specific areas and localities. This course and unit aim at creating discussions on the fact that every part of the world contributed to industrial revolution, which has so far shaped the contemporary society.

Topic

Therefore, the topic that will be covered in this course is “Big Seven Era: Industrialization and its Consequences, 1750-1914 CE”. The topic “Big Seven Era: Industrialization and its Consequences, 1750-1914 CE” will be broken down and discussed into smaller units that include:

  • The Modern Revolution
  • The Industrial Revolution as a World Event, 1750-1850
  • The Atlantic Revolutions as a World Event, 1750-1850
  • Peoples and their governments: A whole new world, 1830-1900
  • Humans in a Hurry: Nineteenth Century Migrations, 1830-1914
  • The Experience of Colonialism, 1850-1914
  • New Identities: Nationalism and Religion, 1850-1914

The above-mentioned topics will make it easier for the teacher to structure the course in a way that major events are discussed in respect to Industrial Revolution.

Importance of Learning the Topic

The modern society borrows a lot from the classical or traditional activities. Contemporary modern society has achieved tremendous developments courtesy of the foundations laid down during the classical or industrial revolution. Teaching this course will therefore enable the students to link the classical and contemporary societies in relation to the industrial revolution. Specifically, the course will enable the student to understand the following aspects:

  • Various discussions on the landscape aspects of industrial revolution will provide students with a deeper understanding of the contemporary world in relation to classical period.
  • The course will provide students with the required understanding on the Big Era of Industrial revolution as well as interrelated factors that drove the industrial revolution.
  • The course will also help the students to understand human and the environment especially during the industrial revolution
  • The students will also be able to understand the relationship between humans and other humans on one hand and between humans and ideas on the other hand during the period of industrial revolution.

Student Information

Student Profile

The course is for 12th Grade High School students (senior) aging between 17 and 19. At the age of 17, a student is able to comprehend and articulate issues with much ease. What’s more, senior high school students have undergone tremendous study from 9th Grade to 11th Grade. In this perspective, such students have a basis or rather foundation for understanding history especially world history. Given such age brackets, this course will assume the following

  • That the students have previously studies world history hence have the necessary basics and foundations for this course
  • That the students are responsible enough to be given assignments that required detail research
  • That the students can learn on their own even without the assistance of the teacher
  • It is also assumed that all the students are aged between 17 and 19 years

Entry Level Skills, Knowledge and Attitudes

A student at 17 is able to comprehend specific contents and subjects within a given course. Therefore, one of the strengths of this group of students is the fact that they can easily comprehend historical concepts and terms used. Besides, it is believed that the students have the capacity and capability of conducting research on their own. However, it should be noted that there is a possibility of the students being swayed away by their peers hence losing focus on the course and in school.

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Backwards Design

Identify Desired Results

In this course, I would want to foster into students the aspect of understanding topics on the basis of content and subject. Most students in earlier levels and grades concentrate more on topic-oriented studies, which enhances mastery of specific concepts. Nonetheless, this course is aimed at fostering into students the ability to inculcate content-oriented learning. Content-oriented learning goes beyond mastery of specific concepts and topics rather it ensures that a student is able to articulate various issues within his or her environment in relation to what is learned in class. Indisputably, it is important and very necessary for students to be able to understand their environments based on what they learn in their schools.

There is no doubt that teaching “Big Seven Era: Industrialization and its Consequences, 1750-1914 CE” will help the students in understanding industrialization and how it has changed the contemporary society. Linking up the classical industrialization revolution and the contemporary environment is a content-oriented aspect of learning, which this course aims to foster amongst the students. Students will therefore be able to always link up what they study and their environments this enhancing the ability of making adequate sense of the environment.

Such study habits enable to students to make sense of their environments hence appreciates every activity that happens in the same environments. This is the main aspect of learning that the course aims at fostering within the students. Besides, the course wishes also to foster into the students the act of conducting in-depth research in specific issues hence provide a clear picture of what they understand.

Assessment

Assessment is an important way of understanding whether students have achieved the desired results or objectives of the course. There are three ways of assessing students that this course will employ. The three ways that will be used to understand whether a student has achieved the desired results or objectives of the study:

  • Continues Assessment Tests (CAT) (20% of the total score)
  • Research paper based on the course content (40% of the total score)
  • Final examinations that tests different aspects of the course (40%)

NOTE: A student who scores a score of 70% from all the assessment is considered to have achieved the desired results. Any score below 70% is considered is a fail.

Instructional Strategies

Instruction strategies are methods used in ensuring that objectives of a lesson are achieved. Instructional strategies provide a sequence or a technique for delivering instructions to enhance the learning process. There are many instructional strategies that can be used to effectively engage students in the learning process.

The main instructional strategies that will be used in this course include:

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  • Tutoring or lecturing of students whilst providing detailed understanding of the various historical concepts
  • Active learning where students will be fully engage in question-answer method
  • Discussions and cooperative learning amongst the students
  • Integration of technology especially the internet search

Unit Lesson Plan Details

Unit Title: 1.0
“The Modern Revolution”
The specific parts of the unit will include:
  • The Atlantic Revolutions
    • American and French Revolution
    • Haitian and Venezuelan Revolutions
  • Impact of Industrial Revolution
    • Characteristics of the Britain’s Revolution
    • Worldwide Industrial Revolution
    • Transport and Communication
    • By-Products of Industrial Revolution
  • Colonialism, 1750-19147
    • Power relationships
    • Upstairs and Downstairs of Colonialism
    • Western Learning
  • Understanding of Modern Revolution
Unit1: Overview
In most cases, modernity is discussed under the aspects of developments and advancements in technology, which cause the improvements in various sectors of an economy. Whilst discussing modernity, there have been inclinations to trappings of modernity that include capitalism, governance, and need for communications and locomotion. Societies characterize by these aspects are considered to be modern whilst those are deficient of the same are regarded as backward societies. Nonetheless, it is important to understand how modernity came to be and factors that played a major rile in the same. In order to understand the aspects of modern revolution, it is worth appreciating the revolutionary changes that occurred between 1789 and 1914. On this basis, this unit will provide a deeper understanding of the various revolutionary changes associated with the modern revolution.
Unit: Objectives
At the end of the unit learners should be able to:
  1. Analyze the concepts and aspects of progress within a society or nation
  2. Identify specific reasons for colonial powers from the European Countries
  3. Explain the correlation between nationalism, racism, colonialism, and industrialization
  4. Describe the changes that occurred between 1789 and 1914 attributable to modern revolution
  5. Analyze the various characteristics of features of industrial revolution associated with modernity

Annotation:
The main concept that students will learn in this unit is the idea of modern revolution while trying to link up the aspects of revolutionary changes between 1789 and 1914 with the current industrial changes. The unit aims at providing the students with the understanding that for every good aspect seen within an economy there must be a strong foundation. The revolutionary changes that occurred between 1789 and 1941 were the strong foundations for the modern revolution.

Unit: Readings
In order to ensure that students have a deeper understanding on this unit and attain the above objectives, the following reading materials will be used:
  • Christian, David. Maps of Time: An Introduction to Big History.Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004.
  • Deane, Phyllis. The First Industrial Revolution. 2ndedition. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1979.
  • Goldstone, Jack A. “Efflorescences and Economic Growth in World History.” Journal of World History13, no. 2 (2002): 323-89.
  • Mokyr, Joel, ed. The Economics of the Industrial Revolution.Totowa, N.J.: Rowman and Allanheld, 1985.
  • Palmer, R. R., Joel Colton, and Lloyd Kramer. A History of the Modern World.9thed. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2002.
  • Simmons, I. G. Changing the Face of the Earth.New York: Basil Blackwell, 1989.
  • Stearns, Peter N., Michael Adas, and Stuart B. Schwartz. World Civilizations.New York: Harper Collins, 1994.
  • Stearns, Peter. The Industrial Revolution in World History.2nded. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1998.

Annotation:
The above sources or materials for reading cut across the various topics to be discussed and learned in this unit. All the readings including the internet will provide students with deeper insight on the topics of the unit. The sources are very inclusive and extensive in as far as the aspects of world history are concerned.

Unit 1: Discussion Board
Some of the aspects that students will be responding to include:
  • Definitions of industrialization, colonialism, racism, modernity, and revolutions
  • Factors that might have led to various forms of revolutions
  • How one can define a modern and a traditional society
  • Specific characteristics of the contemporary society
  • Is the contemporary society modern or still traditional despite the fact that people claim we are in a modern society?

Annotation:
The above discussion prompts will enable the students to develop the idea of not only airing their views in respect to particular topic but also enhance their thinking and reasoning capacities within the course.

Unit 1: Seminar (Describe the activities and discussions you will be having during the synchronous seminar. Describe materials that you will bring into the seminar environment.)

Annotation: Describe what you what to accomplish specifically and why you think this will be effective.

Unit: Wiki (If you are going to use a wiki, describe the activity that you will have students do. Include whether the activity is independent or collaborative.)

Annotation: Describe what you what to accomplish specifically and why you think this will be effective.

Unit: Blog (If you are going to use blogs, describe the activity that you will have students do. Include whether the activity is independent or collaborative.)

Annotation: Describe what you what to accomplish specifically and why you think this will be effective.

Unit: Quiz (If you are going to use a quiz or test, describe the types of questions that you will use and give two examples of the questions.)

Annotation: Describe what you what to accomplish specifically and why you think this will be effective.

Unit: Assignment (If you are going to require students to write a paper or project, describe it here.)

Annotation: Describe what you what to accomplish specifically and why you think this will be effective.

Unit: Presentational Media (If you are going to incorporate media into the unit, describe the purpose and detail and how you expect students to interact with it.)

Annotation: Describe what you what to accomplish specifically and why you think this will be effective.

Unit: Collaborative Media(If you are going to incorporate collaborative media, like a VoiceThread, into the unit describe the project and write the concept in terms that students will understand. Don’t worry about the step-by-step instructions for using the tool.)

Annotation: Describe what you what to accomplish specifically and why you think this will be effective.

Unit: Other Content: (Describe other content you might use or develop. Videos, Open Source Learning Objects, etc. Provide links to media that is already created.)

Annotation: Describe what you what to accomplish specifically and why you think this will be effective.

Add more rows if needed.

What you bring to the classroom

(In this section, give write an assessment of yourself as an online instructor. What are your strengths and/or weaknesses? How will you establish your teaching presence online?)

References

Christian, D. (2004). Maps of Time: An Introduction to Big History. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Deane, P. (1979). The First Industrial Revolution. 2nd edition. Cambridge: Cambridge UP.

Goldstone, J. A. (2002). “Efflorescences and Economic Growth in World History.” Journal of World History 13(2); 323-89.

Mokyr, J., ed (1985). The Economics of the Industrial Revolution. Totowa, N.J.: Rowman and Allanheld.

Palmer, R. R., Joel, C., and Lloyd, K. (2002). A History of the Modern World. 9th ed. Boston: McGraw Hill.

Simmons, I. G. (1989). Changing the Face of the Earth. New York: Basil Blackwell.

Stearns, Peter N., Michael A., and Stuart B. S. (1994). World Civilizations. New York: Harper Collins.

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Stearns, P. (1998). The Industrial Revolution in World History. 2nd ed. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

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StudyCorgi. (2021, February 15). Industrialization and Its Consequences: Lesson Plan. Retrieved from https://studycorgi.com/industrialization-and-its-consequences-lesson-plan/

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StudyCorgi. (2021, February 15). Industrialization and Its Consequences: Lesson Plan. https://studycorgi.com/industrialization-and-its-consequences-lesson-plan/

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"Industrialization and Its Consequences: Lesson Plan." StudyCorgi, 15 Feb. 2021, studycorgi.com/industrialization-and-its-consequences-lesson-plan/.

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StudyCorgi. "Industrialization and Its Consequences: Lesson Plan." February 15, 2021. https://studycorgi.com/industrialization-and-its-consequences-lesson-plan/.

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StudyCorgi. 2021. "Industrialization and Its Consequences: Lesson Plan." February 15, 2021. https://studycorgi.com/industrialization-and-its-consequences-lesson-plan/.

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StudyCorgi. (2021) 'Industrialization and Its Consequences: Lesson Plan'. 15 February.

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