Strategic Thinking and Military Lessons | Free Essay Example

Strategic Thinking and Military Lessons

Words: 868
Topic: Psychology
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Orientation

To a large extent, I would consider myself a strategic thinker since strategic thinking is my basic orientation to mission-driven cooperative work. This is true because I believe strategic thinking is an important facet for growth and also an effective component for adapting to change in today’s fast-paced world (regardless of the type of activity one is engaged in). I try to engage this concept in my daily life while working with other people in whatever activity I get involved in. Conversely, I am a strong proponent of thinking, acting, planning, rethinking, and re-planning all over again when developing my projects to attain my periodic organizational goals in the group context. My daily life, therefore, revolves around the goal of approaching everything almost entirely from a strategic point of view.

Practically, I do my duties not only based on the long term vision I have but also on the strategic plans I have in almost every engagement I am involved in.

I also perceive every situation I am faced with from a holistic perspective, meaning I try to comprehensively encompass all relevant factors towards the attainment of a certain goal. This also entails the systematic approach to daily tasks but with the constant improvement of daily processes for better results.

The desired outcome and focus of my tasks are also critical components to the success of my daily goals, but there is also a unique relationship between my organizational components with the constant feedback I get from my supervisors. In this manner, I am able to identify the specific leverage platforms where I can improve my performance for both personal and organizational growth. These factors withstanding, I consider myself a strategic thinker.

Cooperation and Support Needed

In line with my personal philosophy of strategic thought, I need “people support” to help me achieve most of my goals as a strategic thinker. This basically involves critical attention to the specifics of stakeholder involvement and stakeholder buy-in to the outcomes expected from my approach to strategic thinking (as part of the group dynamic involvement in strategic thought). In detail, the cooperation and support I get from other people help me get around a few functional areas.

First, I am able to improve on my work outcomes from the critical comments, appreciative inquiries, and the dialogue I initiate with some of my colleagues. In this manner, I am able to be on toes by incorporating third-party views, which practically expand my perception when tackling specific tasks (Wootton, 2000, p. 4). From this approach, I can comfortably say that skeptics are some of my most important facilitators to the attainment of positive strategic outcomes. Secondly, I am able to have a consensus decision making enhancement with third parties in my quest to come up with prudent strategic outcomes.

To some extent, this entails my colleagues or any other third party actively supporting my decisions, but conversely, I can also be able to benefit from third parties by tapping into their talents, something which I couldn’t have benefitted from if I were working alone.

Thirdly, I am able to get feedback from my colleagues, an element that is quite important to the development of strategic outcomes. This incorporates the process of involvement and participation through processes such as parallel involvement where I am able to come up with future-oriented ideas on how best I can improve my processes to come up with even better activities that reflect growth in my strategic thinking process (Wootton, 2000, p. 1). Lastly, from the cooperation and support I get from external parties, I am able to develop stay-in and buy-in commendations from external parties, especially those who are relevant to the success of my strategic goals.

Military Lessons Learnt to Aid Strategic Goals

From my learned military lessons, I have appreciated the importance of discipline, which is also an important component in the success of my goal as a strategic thinker (Moss, 2009, p, 23). This is true because strategic thinking is nothing but a disciplined way of thinking, only that it’s got to be done consistently and practically on a daily basis. This involves the holistic perception of the general outcomes and the converse relationship between the institutional components and its influence on the success of my strategic goals.

Also, from my military experiences regarding the importance of working as a team and viewing colleagues as partners, I am able to apply the same concept in improving my strategic goals because I can seek support from my colleagues in improving my strategic goals (Moss, 2009, p, 35). This concept helps in improving my overall performance in attaining daily objectives and improving my strategic processes as well.

Conclusion

Strategic thinking is a process and not an eventuality. However, all there is to it is thinking in a broader, more holistic way and in a constant manner such that it becomes part of one’s daily life or routine. Strategic thinking enables a person to reach levels that one could have otherwise not reached if they were to work in a conventional manner. However, the support and cooperation from other people are also important in reaching heights of success. Personally, this is the best philosophy in cooperative work.

References

Haines, S. (2006). Becoming a Strategic Thinker on a Daily Basis. San Diego, Ca: Centre Strategic Management. Print.

Moss, G. (2009). Vietnam: An American Ordeal. New York: Prentice-Hall. Print.

Wootton, S. (2000). Strategic Thinking: A Step-By-Step Approach to Strategy. New York: Kogan Page Publishers. Print.