Print Сite this

Sex Education Among Young People

Dispensing contraceptives

Dispensing contraceptives to students in high schools has long been a controversial topic for many parents, teachers, and concerned citizens. These people argue that giving out free condoms would only encourage teenagers to have more sex. While this might be true to a certain degree, a recent survey indicates that over 45% of students “had had sexual contact with the opposite sex” (Kann et al. 2018). Therefore, it appears more logical to promote safe practices, rather than trying to enforce abstinence.

We will write a
custom essay
specifically for you

for only $16.05 $11/page
308 certified writers online
Learn More

Cognitive, emotional, and developmental issues

The decision to have sex for tweens and teens is usually influenced by several cognitive, emotional, and developmental issues. Adolescents tend to conform to peer pressure while also trying to gain respect and independence. They also develop emotionally and can become capable of beginning a healthy and loving relationship. Schools must understand these facts when providing sex education and supplying contraceptives. There is little that can be done to eliminate the harmful influence of other young people, but teachers could try to inform couples about the importance of safe sex.

The role of parents in sex education

The role of parents in sex education seems to be largely underestimated or misunderstood. It is not uncommon for them to delay or even avoid talking to their children about sex, which results in a lack of trust. To combat this, the CDC recommends that parents become more involved in this process (“Sexual Risk Behaviors” 2020). The societal problem of teens having sex too early can be solved if people accept it as a fact. Even though it might seem wrong, the practical solution would then be to begin teaching the youth about sex at a younger age. In the modern era, children are bound to discover sexual content, and it would be better if they were adequately prepared.

References

Kann, Laura, Tim McManus, William A. Harris, Shari L. Shanklin, Katherine H. Flint, Barbara Queen, Richard Lowry, et al. 2018. “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance — United States, 2017.” MMWR. Surveillance Summaries 67 (8): 1–114. Web.

“Sexual Risk Behaviors.” 2020. CDC.Web.

Cite this paper

Select style

Reference

StudyCorgi. (2022, March 15). Sex Education Among Young People. Retrieved from https://studycorgi.com/sex-education-among-young-people/

Reference

StudyCorgi. (2022, March 15). Sex Education Among Young People. https://studycorgi.com/sex-education-among-young-people/

Work Cited

"Sex Education Among Young People." StudyCorgi, 15 Mar. 2022, studycorgi.com/sex-education-among-young-people/.

* Hyperlink the URL after pasting it to your document

1. StudyCorgi. "Sex Education Among Young People." March 15, 2022. https://studycorgi.com/sex-education-among-young-people/.


Bibliography


StudyCorgi. "Sex Education Among Young People." March 15, 2022. https://studycorgi.com/sex-education-among-young-people/.

References

StudyCorgi. 2022. "Sex Education Among Young People." March 15, 2022. https://studycorgi.com/sex-education-among-young-people/.

References

StudyCorgi. (2022) 'Sex Education Among Young People'. 15 March.

This paper was written and submitted to our database by a student to assist your with your own studies. You are free to use it to write your own assignment, however you must reference it properly.

If you are the original creator of this paper and no longer wish to have it published on StudyCorgi, request the removal.