Print Сite this

The Democrat and the Dictator: Roosevelt’s and Hitler’s Speech

Roosevelt’s Speech

Roosevelt’s inaugural address (1933) reveals that the difficulties he considers to be the reason of hardships “concern, thank God, only material things” (para. 2). Roosevelt (1933) thinks the cause of the problems of his nation is that “Practices of the unscrupulous money changers stand indicted in the court of public opinion, rejected by the hearts and minds of men” (para. 4). Therefore, Roosevelt laces blame for the failure of the economic system on the incompetent leadership and personal agenda of the “money changers” that primarily tried to achieve their interests and increase their fortune. Roosevelt (1933) also reproaches the nation for not being able to pursue higher ideals as he notes that “happiness lies not in the mere possession of money” (para. 7).

We will write a
custom essay
specifically for you

for only $16.05 $11/page
308 certified writers online
Learn More

Roosevelt does not consider unemployment to be an insurmountable problem. Putting people to work “can be accomplished in part by direct recruiting by the Government itself, treating the task as we would treat the emergency of a war, but at the same time, through this employment, accomplishing greatly needed projects to stimulate and reorganize the use of our natural resources” (Roosevelt, 1933, para. 10).

The economic problems can be solved by thoroughly controlling the banking, investments, and credits (Roosevelt, 1933). This is achieved by rigorously overseeing the economic processes. In turn, the agricultural difficulties are a result of the uneven spread of the population across the country. While considering this problem, Roosevelt (1933) offers a significant amount of solutions to it. Finally, Roosevelt (1933) addresses the foreign policy of the United States by stating that it is not of utmost importance at the moment, but the US must try its best to live as a “good neighbour”.

Hitler’s Speech

In his speech, Hitler takes a more philosophical approach to estimating the problems that German nation had at hands. He places the blame on the Germany’s involvement in the World War I and the regime that had overtaken the German nation since the November Revolution of 1918 (Hitler, 1933). He then proceeds to state that “the insane conception of victors and vanquished destroyed the confidence existing between nations, and, at the same time, the industry of the entire world” (Hitler, 1933, para. 2). He also assumes that the Marxism and bolshevism will result in disastrous consequences to the Germany itself in not more than a year (Hitler, 1933).

Hitler (1933) sees the solution of the unemployment in the compulsory labor-service which, coupled with the back-to-the-land policy, result in decrease of the numbers of unemployed citizens. The economic difficulties are to be overcome by “reorganization of the administrative and fiscal systems of the Reich, of the Federal States, and the Communes” (Hitler, 1933, para. 16). Moreover, “In economical administration, the promotion of employment, the preservation of the farmer, as well as in the exploitation of individual initiative, the Government sees the best guarantee for the avoidance of any experiments which would endanger the currency” (Hitler, 1933, para. 20). The “preservation of the farmer” is also seen by Hitler as a solution to agricultural problems. The foreign policy, according to Hitler (1933), must at the moment not be focused on establishing connections with other nations. Instead, it must be focused on reinforcing the Germany from within which will lead to a stronger nation that will ensure the peace across the world.

Concluding Statement

The common ground for both Roosevelt and Hitler could be found in the fact that both of the leaders were reproaching the governmental leadership that existed at that time. Both of them invoked their nations to unite and fight for the better future together. As for the power of their position, both Roosevelt and Hitler saw themselves as leaders. Nevertheless, they insisted that it is their nations that have the power, and not their leaders.

References

Hitler, A. (1933). Berlin: proclamation to the German nation. Web.

Get your
100% original paper
on any topic

done in as little as
3 hours
Learn More

Roosevelt, F. D. (1933). First Inaugural Address. Web.

Cite this paper

Select style

Reference

StudyCorgi. (2021, December 30). The Democrat and the Dictator: Roosevelt’s and Hitler’s Speech. Retrieved from https://studycorgi.com/the-democrat-and-the-dictator-roosevelts-and-hitlers-speech/

Reference

StudyCorgi. (2021, December 30). The Democrat and the Dictator: Roosevelt’s and Hitler’s Speech. https://studycorgi.com/the-democrat-and-the-dictator-roosevelts-and-hitlers-speech/

Work Cited

"The Democrat and the Dictator: Roosevelt’s and Hitler’s Speech." StudyCorgi, 30 Dec. 2021, studycorgi.com/the-democrat-and-the-dictator-roosevelts-and-hitlers-speech/.

1. StudyCorgi. "The Democrat and the Dictator: Roosevelt’s and Hitler’s Speech." December 30, 2021. https://studycorgi.com/the-democrat-and-the-dictator-roosevelts-and-hitlers-speech/.


Bibliography


StudyCorgi. "The Democrat and the Dictator: Roosevelt’s and Hitler’s Speech." December 30, 2021. https://studycorgi.com/the-democrat-and-the-dictator-roosevelts-and-hitlers-speech/.

References

StudyCorgi. 2021. "The Democrat and the Dictator: Roosevelt’s and Hitler’s Speech." December 30, 2021. https://studycorgi.com/the-democrat-and-the-dictator-roosevelts-and-hitlers-speech/.

References

StudyCorgi. (2021) 'The Democrat and the Dictator: Roosevelt’s and Hitler’s Speech'. 30 December.

This paper was written and submitted to our database by a student to assist your with your own studies. You are free to use it to write your own assignment, however you must reference it properly.

If you are the original creator of this paper and no longer wish to have it published on StudyCorgi, request the removal.