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Public Health Interventions and Economics: Malaria

The case study advocated for the use of treated mosquito nets as an effective intervention for preventing malaria-related maternal deaths. An independent cost-effectiveness analysis of the intervention reveals that using treated mosquito nets is an effective intervention for reducing maternal deaths. The cost of a mosquito net is low, compared to the cost of treating a sick mother or losing an unborn child to the disease. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is $41.46 per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the mother and the newborn is $1.02 per DALY averted. Similarly, the decrease in neonatal mortality is $1.08. These figures show that the cost of prevention is lower than treatment. In some African countries, expectant women get mosquito nets free. Well-wishers and international health agencies usually donate them. Since there is little or no cost associated with availing these nets to pregnant mothers, using treated mosquito nets is a cost-effective intervention for minimizing maternal deaths associated with malaria (Bhattacharya, 2013).

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The proposed intervention would not work in my community because the incidence of maternal deaths, associated with malaria, is very low. Schantz-Dunn and Nour (2009) say the US has successfully eradicated malaria. Based on this background, it is difficult to convince expectant women in my community to sleep under a mosquito net if they do not see the need to do so in the first place. Therefore, this intervention would not work in my community. Nonetheless, since malaria-related neo-natal deaths in America are negligible, does it mean that the cost-effectiveness of the intervention is “0” (zero)?

References

Bhattacharya, D. (2013). Public Health Policy: Issues, Theories, and Advocacy. San Fransisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Schantz-Dunn, J., & Nour, N. (2009). Malaria and Pregnancy: A Global Health Perspective. Rev Obstet Gynecol, 2(3), 186–192.

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StudyCorgi. 2022. "Public Health Interventions and Economics: Malaria." April 10, 2022. https://studycorgi.com/public-health-interventions-and-economics-malaria/.

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StudyCorgi. (2022) 'Public Health Interventions and Economics: Malaria'. 10 April.

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