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Annotated Bibliography: Social Media and Mental Health

Coyne, S. M., Rogers, A. A., Zurcher, J. D., Stockdale, L., & Booth, M. (2020). Does time spent using social media impact mental health? An eight year longitudinal study. Computers in Human Behavior. 104, 106160, 1-17. Web. 

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This research aimed to find a link between time used on social media and mental health issues such as depression and anxiety. Therefore, while most people blame social media for mental health disorders, it was imperative to find the real culprit. The results show that social media is not destroying the younger generation despite previous attempts that link social media to increased mental health problems. The research analyzed the time spent on social media as a factor in the examination. The study thus shows the importance of context and content surrounding internet use when making conclusions. The research targets a knowledgeable audience through complex statistical analysis to present the data. This study shows the multi-faceted nature of understanding the relationship between social media and mental health, requiring extensive research to comprehend its effects adequately.

Glazzard, J., & Mitchell, C. (2018). Social Media and Mental Health in Schools. Critical Publishing.

While social media has several benefits due to its revolutionary impact on communication, it surpassed expectations, especially concerning the mental health of young people. The authors further highlight the importance of social media and digital literacy skills. Therefore, while it may be challenging to filter content on the internet, teaching young people to identify and critically evaluate it can reduce harmful effects. Glazzard is a Professor of Teacher Education, while Mitchel is vastly experienced in learning technologies in higher education. Therefore, they provide an essential perspective on the topic based on their knowledge in the sector. This source offers context for the issue under study by highlighting the importance of social media in the education of young people and later showcases the dangers associated with it.

Krugman, P. (2020). Trump’s coronavirus response was beyond incompetent. ​The New York Times. Web.

The author suggests that the massive loss of life and economic turmoil are as a result of the President’s incompetence as the head of state. In his opinion, the failure to take immediate and decisive action further exacerbated the situation leading to a surge in infections and higher death rates. For instance, the insistence on opening up the country for rallies and businesses did not heed the advice from experts regarding the spread of the virus. Furthermore, Trump also insisted that the coronavirus was not dangerous and would eventually go away, thus encouraging people to interact freely without any containment measures. These factors, therefore, made America a hotspot of the virus, leading both in the number of infections and deaths. The author tries to convince the audience to understand his point of view by using evidence to highlight misplaced priorities by the President. This source thus compares the behaviors and actions throughout the year to show inadequacies in the policies put in place.

Mazzochi, D. (2019). Rep. Mazzochi hosting social media and mental health forum. Patch. Web.

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The poster presented invites residents of the area to the forum aiming to educate them on issues surrounding social media and mental health. From the description, a picture of people using smartphones portrays an obsession with them. Furthermore, the tone in the language used tries to elicit reactions among its readers since the topic of discussion is capitalized to stress its importance. The poster, prepared by a representative in the district, also looks to highlight the rising problem in the community by providing an intervention to stop the menace. More so, it targets teenagers, parents, educators, and any other related parties directly affected by the negativity of increased internet use. The importance of this source lies in evaluating its ability to pass a message to the masses through images and textual descriptions.

Schwartz, C. (2020). Is everybody doing … OK? Let’s ask social media. The New York Times. Web.

Social media can be used to determine the wellbeing of an individual through an analysis of their word choices. The development of the hedonometer represents a breakthrough in analyzing the mental health of users on the internet. The process involves collecting 10% of posts on Twitter that are then ranked regarding their connotations to either happiness or sadness. The choice of words used by individuals thus can reveal information about the moods and character traits of individuals. The results show declining levels of happiness among users on Twitter over the ten years of data collection. The developers of the technology are trained mathematicians, and computer scientists thus have vast experience in the field. This source therefore provides an alternative view on analyzing data from social media use and linking it to the mental wellbeing of its users.

Tankersley, J. (2020). Does Trump want to save his economy? ​The New York Times​. Web.

According to the author, President Trump gives the impression of minimal care to the plight of Americans. With the Coronavirus pandemic affecting the whole country, many people lost their source of livelihood, thus causing a downturn in the economy. However, the President only proposed populist measures aimed at maintaining a positive image rather than assisting the country in overcoming the challenges it is facing. For instance, the country experienced a growing national debt and budget deficits, adding to the turmoil. Furthermore, the tax reforms did not hugely benefit the ordinary citizens, thus hinting to the possibility of a recession if mishandled. This article thus raises essential questions on the President’s reasoning and decision making at critical points of his tenure. It further purports to develop meaningful conversations with the incoming election in America.

TEDx Talks. (2017). Is social media hurting your mental health? | Bailey Parnell | TEDxRyersonU [Video]. YouTube. Web.

The presenter reiterates that social media has unintended consequences on an individual’s mental health. The 18-24-year-old age bracket occupies the largest demographic of users on social media, hence the most affected by this phenomenon. As a result, the most common diagnoses at a study conducted on campuses identified anxiety, depression, and stress as the prevalent conditions caused by increased social media engagement. Parnell identified the main problems on social media as the comparison with others, social currency through shares, likes and comments, fear of missing out (FOMO), and online harassment. The presenter works in social marketing and was researching the effects of social media on mental health thus knowledgeable on the topic. Therefore, the source provides evidence through research and provides a personal analysis of social media use in daily life.

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References

Coyne, S. M., Rogers, A. A., Zurcher, J. D., Stockdale, L., & Booth, M. (2020). Does time spent using social media impact mental health? An eight year longitudinal study. Computers in Human Behavior. 104, 106160, 1-17. Web.

Glazzard, J., & Mitchell, C. (2018). Social Media and Mental Health in Schools. Critical Publishing.

Krugman, P. (2020). Trump’s coronavirus response was beyond incompetent. ​The New York Times. Web.

Mazzochi, D. (2019). Rep. Mazzochi hosting social media and mental health forum. Patch. Web.

Schwartz, C. (2020). Is everybody doing … OK? Let’s ask social media. The New York Times. Web.

Tankersley, J. (2020). Does Trump want to save his economy? ​The New York Times​. Web.

TEDx Talks. (2017). Is social media hurting your mental health? | Bailey Parnell | TEDxRyersonU [Video]. YouTube. Web.

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